SUBSCRIBE NOW

  • Subscribe to MyRye.com: Enter your email address:

TRANSLATE

Twitter Updates

    follow me on Twitter

    © Jay Sears, All Rights Reserved.

    « Pickup Game, Spelling Bee: F-i-s-c-a-l C-o-n-s-t-r-a-i-n-t-s: Rye City School District Board of Education Meeting Notes - 01/26/2010 | Main | Rye Bus #76 Expected to be Granted Stay of Execution »

    Comments

    Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

    tedc

    “..shutting it down disproportionately affects the elderly and the poor. Elders who can no longer drive won't be able to get out and, critically, home health care workers who serve them won't be able to get in.”

    Well said Tom. This is very serious business and something the pols may screw up. Who could imaging a critical solo route like this could be marked for a budget cut while an 8 percent county tax increase is headed straight at Rye?

    Robert Zahm

    Looks like the cash cost s $2.25 which, with the previously given volume and cost info makes the subsidy out to about $110,489/year.
    http://www.westchestergov.com/beelinebus/web_pdf_documents/web_new_6_28_09_full_fares.pdf

    And I understand the social policies associated with susidizing the cost of public transportation, but wouldn't a fully-recovered service (maybe at lower usage, but I assumed no weekend travel) be better than no service at all?

    Average Citizen

    Anybody know the current fare?

    Tom Saunders

    Full-cost recovery pricing misses the point of public transportation. Like any networked service, e.g. telephony or electrification, the economies of scale achieved on high-traffic bus routes should subsidize service in less densely populated areas.

    Low ridership alone shouldn't drive the decision; its impact should. This route is Rye's only public connection to shopping and Metro North, and shutting it down disproportionately affects the elderly and the poor. Elders who can no longer drive won't be able to get out and, critically, home health care workers who serve them won't be able to get in.

    Robert Zahm

    Hmmm. 225 passengers / day - making 1 trip each; Assume 260 working days. 225 x 260 = 58,500 trips / year. At a service cost of $242,114 / year, that means each trip should cost a bit more than $4. Somebody wants to shut it down? Why don't they try charging a full-cost recovery price?

    The comments to this entry are closed.